Swan Songs

forever lost in forsaken missives...

Um…. Holy Shit, MONA.
juhavantzelfde:

The Quietus | Features | Crisis Music: The Bug’s Angels & Devils Reviewed

"Since the 2008 financial crash, it’s almost inevitably become a cliche to discuss the sonics of contemporary pop music in terms linked to our experience of crisis-stricken Western capitalism. Dread sensations and hauntings. Information overload and maximalism. Comforting nostalgia for an imagined pastoral idyll. Bleakest ever bleak aesthetics as a mirror of our powerlessness in the face of crumbling economies, militarised police activity and what feels like a state of perpetual war. Doing so, however eloquently, to some extent feels like covering obvious ground - of course art doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and facile comparisons or reductionist analyses don’t help anyone. But, then, how else to proceed? 

You can’t ignore that the geopolitical atmosphere we live within is seeping insidiously into the music we create and listen to, especially in a twelve-month period that’s so far seen the release of unique records like Actress’ Ghettoville, Sleaford Mods’ Divide & Exit, Heatsick’s Re-engineering and copeland’s Because I’m Worth It, each of which tackles themes of systemic corruption, alienation and disempowerment on its own self-dictated terms. Equally, sound’s capacity to evoke and explore complex cocktails of emotions and affects has meant that some of the most forceful and resonant artworks of the last few years have been musical.”

juhavantzelfde:

The Quietus | Features | Crisis Music: The Bug’s Angels & Devils Reviewed

"Since the 2008 financial crash, it’s almost inevitably become a cliche to discuss the sonics of contemporary pop music in terms linked to our experience of crisis-stricken Western capitalism. Dread sensations and hauntings. Information overload and maximalism. Comforting nostalgia for an imagined pastoral idyll. Bleakest ever bleak aesthetics as a mirror of our powerlessness in the face of crumbling economies, militarised police activity and what feels like a state of perpetual war. Doing so, however eloquently, to some extent feels like covering obvious ground - of course art doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and facile comparisons or reductionist analyses don’t help anyone. But, then, how else to proceed?

You can’t ignore that the geopolitical atmosphere we live within is seeping insidiously into the music we create and listen to, especially in a twelve-month period that’s so far seen the release of unique records like Actress’ Ghettoville, Sleaford Mods’ Divide & Exit, Heatsick’s Re-engineering and copeland’s Because I’m Worth It, each of which tackles themes of systemic corruption, alienation and disempowerment on its own self-dictated terms. Equally, sound’s capacity to evoke and explore complex cocktails of emotions and affects has meant that some of the most forceful and resonant artworks of the last few years have been musical.”

inneroptics:

Dance with a mask of deer, Fosco Maraini

inneroptics:

Dance with a mask of deer, Fosco Maraini

(via lunenymph)

“For art to be ‘un-political’ means only to ally itself with the ruling group.”

—   Bertolt Brecht - A Short Organum for the Theatre  (via adult-mag)

(Source: bustakay, via nathanielstuart)

The Knife are no more – read their last interview
http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/article/21359/1/the-knife-are-no-more-read-their-last-interview

"And as things fell apart, nobody paid much attention."
Recent picture taken in Gaza.

“Hawaii once had a rat problem. Then, somebody hit upon a brilliant solution. Import mongooses from India. Mongooses would kill the rats. It worked. Mongooses did kill the rats. Mongooses also killed chickens, young pigs, birds, cats, dogs, and small children. There have been reports of mongooses attacking motorbikes, power lawn mowers, golf carts, and James Michener. In Hawaii now, there are as many mongooses as there once were rats. Hawaii had traded its rat problem for a mongoose problem. Hawaii was determined nothing like that would ever happen again…Society had a crime problem. It hired cops to attack crime. Now society has a cop problem.”

—   Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker (1980)

(Source: falala-dispute, via elige)

Meanwhile, in Adelaide:
“On Dit was on the ground, and we can confirm that the protesters were not attempting to storm the Bragg. A crowd of protesters had congregated near the Eastern side of the Bragg building. The protesters were noisy, but aside from one student trying to get past the police-barrier, there was no physical incident with the police, with protesters being contained on the other side of the fence.The mounted police lined up behind the crowd of protesters, and On Dit editor Yasmin Martin stood in the gap between protestors and mounted police to take a photograph of the mounted police in a row (approximately 2 meters away from them). On Dit can confirm that the mounted police gave no warning before charging into the crowd. The only interaction between mounted police and the protestors was limited to protestors shouting at the police.The mounted police charged without warning, and Yasmin only just got out of the way of a charging horse. The area was too crowded for everyone to move out of the way, and 2 students went under.”

This was at a protest at a speech being made by the Prime Minister at The University of Adelaide. Unfortunately my plans ran over and I couldn’t make it, but interesting to see the vibe being carried through the current political climate.

SMASHING PUMPKINS: TEAR

(Source: youtube.com)

Tonight’s moods; brought to you by the crown prince.

Fritz Hegenbart
vicemag:

Maybe We Should’t Be So Quick to Idolize a Gay-Bashing Skateboarder 
Jay Adams, a guy who had really good balance on his skateboard and, as a member of the Z-Boys, helped to define skating as we know it, died from a heart attack on Thursday while vacationing in Mexico. Although he lived most of his life outside the spotlight, he was brought into mainstream consciousness in 2001 thanks to the documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys, and then again in 2005, when he was portrayed by Emile Hirsch in Lords of Dogtown. Adams’s death was picked up by most major news outlets, almost all of which used the words “legend” or “legendary” in their headlines and went on to describe him as a bad boy who pushed the sport away from dance-y, ballerina-style contests and into the more aggressive street and pool skating that birthed modern-day skateboarding. Less discussed was the gay-bashing Adams initiated in Los Angeles that left a man dead.
While I appreciate Adams’s contribution to skateboarding as much as the next guy, it seems odd that virtually every obituary published over the last four days has glossed over or completely failed to mention that one time in 1982 when he helped kill a guy. Adams, describing the incident toJuice magazine in 2000, said, “After a show at the Starwood we went to a place called the Okiedogs and two homosexual guys walked by and I started a fight.” One of those homosexuals was named Dan Bradbury, and, as mentioned above, was killed in the brawl. Although Adams was charged with murder, he claimed that he had left the fight by the time the man died, and was convicted of felony assault. He served just six months in prison.
Scanning through the barrage of celebratory obituaries, one could be forgiven for missing that rather large blemish on Adams’s resume.
The initial New York Times obituary on his death failed to mention that Adams, who, as their headline says, “changed skateboarding into something radical,” participated in what looks an awful lot like a hate crime a few decades ago. A more in-depth follow-up story published Sunday with the title “In Empty Pools, Sport’s Pioneer Found a Way to Make a Splash” devotes one sentence to it: “In 1982 he was convicted of felony assault for involvement in the stomping death of a gay man at a concert in Hollywood.” The Associated Press acknowledged the incident in which the “colorful rebel” started a fight and then helped beat a gay man to death by writing, “At the height of his fame in the early 1980s, Adams was convicted of felony assault, launching a string of prison stints over the next 24 years”—with no mention of the fact that the victim was a gay man, or that he died as a result. The Los Angeles Times, who called Adams “legendary” and “one of the edgy Z-boys of the sport,” devoted one sentence to the incident, also with no mention of the fact that Bradbury was gay, summing it up neatly: “He served six months for his involvement in a fight in Hollywood that resulted a man’s death.” [sic]
Continue

vicemag:

Maybe We Should’t Be So Quick to Idolize a Gay-Bashing Skateboarder 

Jay Adams, a guy who had really good balance on his skateboard and, as a member of the Z-Boys, helped to define skating as we know it, died from a heart attack on Thursday while vacationing in Mexico. Although he lived most of his life outside the spotlight, he was brought into mainstream consciousness in 2001 thanks to the documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys, and then again in 2005, when he was portrayed by Emile Hirsch in Lords of Dogtown. Adams’s death was picked up by most major news outlets, almost all of which used the words “legend” or “legendary” in their headlines and went on to describe him as a bad boy who pushed the sport away from dance-y, ballerina-style contests and into the more aggressive street and pool skating that birthed modern-day skateboarding. Less discussed was the gay-bashing Adams initiated in Los Angeles that left a man dead.

While I appreciate Adams’s contribution to skateboarding as much as the next guy, it seems odd that virtually every obituary published over the last four days has glossed over or completely failed to mention that one time in 1982 when he helped kill a guy. Adams, describing the incident toJuice magazine in 2000, said, “After a show at the Starwood we went to a place called the Okiedogs and two homosexual guys walked by and I started a fight.” One of those homosexuals was named Dan Bradbury, and, as mentioned above, was killed in the brawl. Although Adams was charged with murder, he claimed that he had left the fight by the time the man died, and was convicted of felony assault. He served just six months in prison.

Scanning through the barrage of celebratory obituaries, one could be forgiven for missing that rather large blemish on Adams’s resume.

The initial New York Times obituary on his death failed to mention that Adams, who, as their headline says, “changed skateboarding into something radical,” participated in what looks an awful lot like a hate crime a few decades ago. A more in-depth follow-up story published Sunday with the title “In Empty Pools, Sport’s Pioneer Found a Way to Make a Splash” devotes one sentence to it: “In 1982 he was convicted of felony assault for involvement in the stomping death of a gay man at a concert in Hollywood.” The Associated Press acknowledged the incident in which the “colorful rebel” started a fight and then helped beat a gay man to death by writing, “At the height of his fame in the early 1980s, Adams was convicted of felony assault, launching a string of prison stints over the next 24 years”—with no mention of the fact that the victim was a gay man, or that he died as a result. The Los Angeles Timeswho called Adams “legendary” and “one of the edgy Z-boys of the sport,” devoted one sentence to the incident, also with no mention of the fact that Bradbury was gay, summing it up neatly: “He served six months for his involvement in a fight in Hollywood that resulted a man’s death.” [sic]

Continue

Ferguson from my TL- August 18 (2/3)

thewilsonblog:

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Ways you can help:

https://twitter.com/SheSeauxSaditty

http://afro-dykey.tumblr.com/post/95096989345/things-you-can-do-for-ferguson

https://www.change.org/p/president-barack-obama-please-enact-new-federal-laws-to-protect-citizens-from-police-violence-and-misconduct

"I only have this warning to all Americans: Whatever this country is willing to do to the least of us, it will one day do to us all."- Killer Mike

(via elige)